Non Communicable Diseases Forum (NCD-F) 

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For the very first time, Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey (BDHS) 2011 has revealed the current status of hypertension and diabetes in Bangladesh. Based on this national level survey it was found that one in nine men and women were diabetic (Measured by taking medication and by the percentage with elevated blood glucose but not taking medication). An additional 25 percent of women and 26 percent of men are pre-diabetic. Four percent of women and 3 percent of men are taking medication for diabetes. Among those who are taking medication for diabetes, only 40 percent of women and 32 percent of men have their blood glucose controlled at normal levels.

Diabetes has a positive relationship with age; 9 percent of women age 35-39 have elevated FPG values or are currently taking diabetes medicine compared with 15 percent of women age 55-59. Urban women are almost twice as likely as rural women to be classified as having diabetes (17 percent compared with 10 percent). Among the divisions, women in Chittagong have the highest percentage of women with diabetes (14 percent), while women in Khulna have the lowest percentage (7 percent). The likelihood of having diabetes increases with the women's education. Women who have completed secondary or higher education are twice as likely to have diabetes as women with no education (19 percent compared with 9 percent). Similar to the pattern observed for education, the percentage of women with diabetes increases with an increase in wealth.

Awareness of diabetes and treatment status among women and men with diabetes. Almost 60 percent of women and 65 percent of men are not aware that their plasma glucose levels are elevated. Five percent of women and men are aware that they are diabetic, have elevated blood glucose at the time of the survey, and are not treating it. More than one in five women and men are aware of their condition and are taking medication to lower the plasma glucose to normal values, but they are not successful in having it under control. Finally, 15 percent of women and 10 percent of men are aware that they have diabetes, are treating it, and have the plasma glucose level controlled within normal levels.

According to the BDHS 2011, 32 percent of women age 35 and older are hypertensive; they have elevated blood pressure values or are currently taking medicine to lower their blood pressure. In addition, 28 percent of women are pre-hypertensive; that is, they have blood pressure values of 120-139 mmHg SBP or 80-89 mmHg DBP and are not taking medication. 18 percent have elevated blood pressure and are not taking medications; 12 percent are hypertensive at Stage 1 (BP 140-159 mmHg SBP or 90-99 mmHg DBP) and 6 percent are hypertensive at stage 2 level (BP 160+ mmHg SBP or 100+ mmHg DBP). Fourteen percent of women classified as hypertensive are taking blood pressure medication.

Among those who are taking medication, 56 percent do not have their BP at a normal level.

Age is positively associated with blood pressure values; 18 percent of women age 35-39 are hypertensive compared with 50 percent of women age 70 and older. Urban women are more likely than rural women to have hypertension (40 percent compared with 29 percent). Across divisions, the percentage of women with hypertension ranges from 37 percent in Khulna to 25 percent in Sylhet. Although there is no clear pattern in the relationship between hypertension and the woman's education, women who have completed secondary or higher education have a lower prevalence of hypertension (27 percent). The percentage of women with hypertension increases with increasing wealth; women in the highest wealth quintile are almost twice as likely as women in the lowest wealth quintile to have hypertension (44 percent compared with 25 percent).

The level of awareness of hypertension and treatment status is presented in Figure 15.2. It shows that 45 percent of women and 57 percent of men who are hypertensive are unaware that they have an elevated blood pressure. Eleven percent of women and 8 percent of men are aware of their hypertension, but are not treating it. One in four women and one in five men are aware of their condition, are taking medication to lower the blood pressure, but are unsuccessful in controlling the elevated blood pressure. Only one in five women and one in six men are aware of their hypertension, are treating it, and have the hypertension under control.

The main presentation for the NCD part of the survey can be found here

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